Bangkok humidity

Bangkok humidity

What is the average humidity in Thailand?

The average annual relative humidity is 79.9% and average monthly relative humidity ranges from 74% in January to 85% in September.

Is it always humid in Thailand?

It’s humid most of the year in Thailand . In the southern provinces during the ‘wet season’, it’s hot and humid all the time (May – November). You will sweat, a lot.

Is Thailand dry or humid?

Thailand’s climate is subtropical throughout most of the country, leading the weather in Thailand to year-round hot and humid conditions. During the hottest months of the year, temperatures regularly top 40° C (105° F). Even during the cooler “winter” season you can expect daily highs to be around 30° C (86° F).

Why is Thailand so humid?

But why is Thailand so hot? The country lies in the subtropics near the equator where the sun shines most intensely and humidity rarely falls below 70%. On top of that, Thailand doesn’t experience summer and winter seasons so there is no escape to the heat in the cooler times of year!

What month should you avoid Thailand?

When to avoid traveling in Thailand Chiang Mai: If possible, avoid visiting from mid-February through early April. This is “burning season” and air quality can be quite bad. Similan Islands: The National Marine Park is closed between the months of November through March.

When should I avoid Thailand?

When not to go to Thailand The south is generally best avoided in October and November, and the Similan Islands are closed between November and March. Avoid Koh Chang and the Andaman coast in June and July.

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What should I avoid in Thailand?

8 Things to Avoid in Thailand (and What to Do Instead) Places for backpackers to stay. Avoid : Khao San Road. Taking taxis. Avoid : Bargaining a flat rate with a taxi driver. Thai entertainment. Avoid : Ping Pong Shows. What to do in Pattaya. Avoid : Seedy areas of Pattaya. Shopping the markets. What to do in Phuket. Elephant tourist attractions. Tours and sightseeing.

Why is Bangkok so hot?

Rains brings humidity and reduces the temperature. Bangkok has much more sunshine, hence it is more hot .

Is Bangkok the hottest city in the world?

While Bangkok doesn’t experience the world’s most extreme summer temperatures, it is the world’s hottest city when it comes to year-round intense heat. Temperatures in the Thai capital routinely rise above 40C during the day, with night-time temperatures hovering at similar levels.

What are the coolest months in Thailand?

Thailand has three seasons of weather in a year: the hot season is from March to May, the rainy season is from June to October, and the cool season is from November to February .

Does Thailand ever get cold?

The cold season is generally from November to February. In Bangkok this means it might get as cold as 60F at the coldest point of the night, but more likely 65F. In the day it might average around, say, 75F. The southern-most regions of Thailand generally don’t have a cold season.

How can I stay cool in Thailand?

7 Ways to Keep Cool in Thailand Water. Everybody knows that you should drink enough water especially when in hot weather and keeping rehydrated really in the best way to stay cool in this climate. Fruit. Spicy Food. Light Clothes. Shower. Air Conditioning (Use Sparingly) Adapt.

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Is Singapore hotter than India?

But as a general rule of thumb, there is about a 50 degree range of temperature in India . In other words, during winters, temperatures can descend to 10ºC (50ºF). And in the summer, temperatures can climb as high as 40ºC (104ºF). But overall, Singapore appears to be hotter throughout the entire year than India is.

Is Bangkok hotter than Manila?

The annual average temperature is 0.1 °C (0.2°F) warmer. Average monthly temperatures vary by 0.1 °C (0.2°F) more in Bangkok . The altitude of the sun at midday is overall 0.3° higher in Bangkok than in Manila , Luzon. Relative humidity levels are 6.1% higher.

Why is Singapore so hot?

Professor Matthias Roth of the department of geography at the National University of Singapore (NUS) attributed the rising temperatures to global warming and the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect – caused by the heat generated from human activities and trapped by urban surfaces such as buildings and roads.

Jack Butterscotch

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